Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for: July, 2021

By NASHVILLE GASTROINTESTINAL SPECIALISTS
July 23, 2021
Category: GI Conditions
Tags: Bowel Changes   Bowel Habits   Stool  
Changes in Bowel HabitsWe all get the occasional bout of diarrhea or constipation, but when bowel changes become the norm, this is when you should turn to a gastroenterologist for answers. While acute changes in bowels are often harmless and can be due to simple issues such as an infection, it’s when problems persist that you should consider talking with a GI specialist. Here’s what you should know about your bowel habits and the warning signs that something more serious might be occurring.

What are the types of bowel changes?

Sure, we know that this is a bit embarrassing to discuss, but the frequency and appearance of your bowel movements can tell your gastroenterologist a lot about the health of your intestinal system, and it can also provide helpful clues to find out why you might be dealing with issues. A gastroenterologist will look at both the color and consistency of a stool sample.

The Color of the Stool

A healthy stool ranges in color from tan to dark brown. If the stool is white, red, clay-colored, or black this gives us a clue that something is wrong. Black or red stools can be signs of a bleed within the intestinal tract while clay-colored or pale stools are often signs of liver or gallbladder problems.

The Consistency of the Stool

Whether the stool is dry, hard, watery, or contains mucus, these are also factors that can help us determine what might be going on in your GI tract. Dry, hard stools may be caused by a poor, low-fiber diet and lack of water, while mucus in the stool could be an indicator of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), an intestinal infection, ulcerative colitis, or bowel obstruction. Your gastroenterologist must run the appropriate tests to rule out certain problems.

The Frequency of Your Bowel Habits

While there is a range of how frequently someone does have a bowel movement (ranging from 3 times a day to 3 times a week), if you don’t have a bowel movement for more than three days it’s time to see a doctor. Conversely, if you’re dealing with diarrhea for more than a day (or you notice blood, mucus, or pus in the stool) you should also give your gastroenterologist a call.

Abdominal pain or persistent bowel changes should have you scheduling an appointment with your gastroenterologist just to be on the safe side. While some changes might be minor, it’s important to pinpoint possible intestinal problems right away before they get worse.

By NASHVILLE GASTROINTESTINAL SPECIALISTS
July 13, 2021
Category: GI Care
Tags: heartburn   Ginger   Upset Stomach   Digestion   Bloating  
GingerGinger is a great spice to keep in your pantry because it is chock full of antioxidants that help combat oxidative stress and may also reduce the risk for lung disease, heart disease, and hypertension. If you’ve ever dealt with a stomachache or a bout of nausea before then you’ve probably heard people say to eat some ginger or sip ginger tea. Is there something to ginger that can actually help your stomach when it’s being topsy-turvy?

Here are some ways in which ginger could help your gut.

It Could Aid in Digestion

Whether your stomach is upset upon waking or you just tried a more adventurous dish at a new restaurant, there are many reasons why your stomach might be feeling a little unhappy. Fortunately, ginger can be a helpful and natural remedy to ease that upset stomach.

How? Ginger is believed to speed up the movement of food through the GI tract, while also protecting the gut. It may also ease bloating, cramping, and gas. If you are dealing with an upset stomach, you may want to boil some fresh ginger or add a little ground ginger to some hot water.

It May Protect Against Heartburn

If you find yourself dealing with that gnawing, burning in your chest, ginger may also keep these problems at bay (or, at the very least, alleviate them). Ginger doesn’t just boost motility of the intestinal tract, it may also protect the gastric lining while reducing stomach acid from flowing back up the esophagus after meals.

It Stops Bloat

Most people will experience bloating at some point, particularly after eating. Whether from overheating or from food intolerance, bloating could be alleviated by drinking ginger tea or eating dried ginger. Indigestion is one of the top reasons for bloating, and ginger has the ability to reduce indigestion, which in turn can stop bloat from happening in the first place. People who are prone to bloating may want to add ground ginger to their morning cup of tea or water to prevent this problem from happening during the day.

It’s important not to ignore ongoing stomach problems. If abdominal pain and cramping, or other intestinal problems keep plaguing you, then it’s time to see a gastroenterologist to find out what’s going on. While natural remedies such as ginger can be helpful for minor and fleeting bouts of nausea and an upset stomach, they won’t be able to treat more serious stomach issues.